South Poland Cleantech Cluster

NordicHouse Café 

networking for Start-ups
organizes the next regular meeting

"How to negotiate with institutional investors - Venture Capital (VC)?"

Date: Wednesday, 29.11.2017 at 18.00 - ??
Location: NordicHouse, ul. św. Anny 5, Krakow

Special guest: Marek Kapturkiewicz, co-founder & partner at Innovation Nest (VC fund), co-founder of SPIN Entrepreneurship School

During the activity of most startups there is a moment in which the so-called bootstrapping, development based on your own financial resources becomes no longer sufficient to effectively grow your business. There is a need for external financing. The type of funding often chosen by start-ups is cooperation with one of the venture capital funds (VC). The undoubted advantages of this type of financing are primarily the development of start-ups without debt, and the ability to use the knowledge and business experience of the VC's representatives. The most serious disadvantage is partial loss of startup control. You will learn about the pros and cons of working with VC funds during our next networking meeting.

Registration: free tickets on negocjacje-vc-spcleantech

Member of the SPCleantech cluster

STMicroelectronics

organizes the event "ST-UP Info Day", 15.11.2019 in Kraków
 

On November 15, 2017 at the Cracow Innovation Center, STMicroelectronics will present its offer and instruments to support Polish startups.
If you would like to participate and receive detailed information about the event, please fill in the form at the web address Info Day

The complexity and the pace of change, combined with the need for integrated and systemic solutions, are presenting a major challenge to local authorities who, traditionally, have developed responses in a “siloed” fashion. This requires organizational change as well as deploying innovative technology and South Poland Cleantech Cluster is seeking to provide support to cities, developing more integrated approaches, by providing a platform for regions businesses to develop the solutions they require.

The concept of a Smart City goes way beyond the transactional relationships between citizen and service provider. It is essentially enabling and encouraging the citizen to become a more active and participative member of the community, for example, providing feedback on the quality of services or the state of roads and the built environment, adopting a more sustainable and healthy lifestyle, volunteering for social activities or supporting minority groups. Furthermore, citizens need employment and “Smart Cities” are often attractive locations to live, work and visit.

But the concept is not static: there is no absolute definition of a smart city, no end point, but rather a process, or series of steps, by which cities become more “liveable” and resilient and, hence, able to respond quicker to new challenges. Thus, a Smart City should enable every citizen to engage with all the services on offer, public as well as private, in a way best suited to his or her needs. It brings together hard infrastructure, social capital including local skills and community institutions, and (digital) technologies to fuel sustainable economic development and provide an attractive environment for all.