South Poland Cleantech Cluster

Janusz Kahl, CEO in South Poland Cleantech Cluster has been chosen by the
European Commission as member of the Steering Committee for the project

„Skills for smart industrial specialization and digital transformation”

for Executive Agency for Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (EASME) acting under the powers delegated by the European Commission EASME / DG GROW, which has been granted to PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) in Luxembourg.

EASME is the largest EU agency managing, among others, EU funds from the HORIZON 2020, COSME, LIFE and ERASMUS+ programs.

Members of the Steering Committee will:

  • monitor work and perform reviews of reports developed by PwC
  • meet in Brussels with EASME and the European Commission to review progress and discuss the preparation of periodic reports, which should be approved by the Steering Committee
  • participate in teleconferences
  • provide advice and guidance during work

Se more: Steering Committee

The complexity and the pace of change, combined with the need for integrated and systemic solutions, are presenting a major challenge to local authorities who, traditionally, have developed responses in a “siloed” fashion. This requires organizational change as well as deploying innovative technology and South Poland Cleantech Cluster is seeking to provide support to cities, developing more integrated approaches, by providing a platform for regions businesses to develop the solutions they require.

The concept of a Smart City goes way beyond the transactional relationships between citizen and service provider. It is essentially enabling and encouraging the citizen to become a more active and participative member of the community, for example, providing feedback on the quality of services or the state of roads and the built environment, adopting a more sustainable and healthy lifestyle, volunteering for social activities or supporting minority groups. Furthermore, citizens need employment and “Smart Cities” are often attractive locations to live, work and visit.

But the concept is not static: there is no absolute definition of a smart city, no end point, but rather a process, or series of steps, by which cities become more “liveable” and resilient and, hence, able to respond quicker to new challenges. Thus, a Smart City should enable every citizen to engage with all the services on offer, public as well as private, in a way best suited to his or her needs. It brings together hard infrastructure, social capital including local skills and community institutions, and (digital) technologies to fuel sustainable economic development and provide an attractive environment for all.