South Poland Cleantech Cluster

organizes in cooperation with

Małopolska Center for Energy-efficient Buildings (MCBE) of the Cracow University of Technology 
Center for Sustainable Development and Energy Conservation AGH in Miękinia

conference

"Passive buildings and NZEB in single- and multi-family housing"

During the 1st day of the conference on 26.04.2018, at 10.00 - 14.00, "Kotłownia", Cracow University of Technology, ul. Warszawska 24, Kraków, you will learn what a passive house is, how to design it, what equipment to use and building materials.

On the 2nd day during the workshop on 27.04.2018, at 11.00 - 19.30, NordicHouse, ul. św. Anny 5, Kraków, you will learn about the methods of implementing facilities in the passive standard, components dedicated to passive construction, the most common executive errors or appropriate executive practices consistent with the current state of knowledge in various fields.

Registration for the 1st day of the conference (buy a free ticket): domy-pasywne.evenea.pl

Platform: “Smart-low carbon buildings, management systems and ecological building materials”

Cluster members such as architects, construction companies, photovoltaic producers, green building materials, building management systems, universities, municipalities and NGOs participate in the platform’s cooperation. The aim of cooperation is to promote innovation among cluster members and to develop an innovative, competitive product to the Polish market.

An Intelligent Building is one that:

  • Provides a productive and cost-effective built environment through optimization of its four basic components – structure, systems, services and management – and the interrelationships between them:
Focusing on the benefit of the owners and their desired indoor environment.
  • So as to maximize the efficiency of its occupants: 
Focusing on the benefit of the users and creating desired indoor environment for occupants
  • Allows effective management of resources with minimum life costs: 
Focusing on the benefit of the Managers and the environmental and economic impact of creating desired indoor environment.

Therefore:

  • The built environment should be productive, safe, healthy, thermally, aurally and visually comfortable.
  • The building has potential to serve future generations: sustainability, or adaptability over the life cycle of the building and safeguarding the earth and environment resources.
  • Financial aspect: the building can be built within some cost constraints whilst retaining market value.

Life Cycle Design

A “cradle-to-grave” analysis of building products, from the gathering of raw materials to their ultimate disposal, provides a better understanding of the long-term costs of materials. These costs are paid not only by the client, but also by the owner, the occupants, and the environment. The principles of Life Cycle Design provide important guidelines for the selection of building materials. Each step of the manufacturing process, from gathering raw materials, manufacturing, distribution, and installation, to ultimate reuse or disposal, is examined for its environmental impact.

A material’s life cycle can be organized into three phases:

Pre-Building; Building; and Post-Building. These stages parallel the life cycle phases of the building itself. The evaluation of building materials’ environmental impact at each stage allows for a cost-benefit analysis over the lifetime of a building, rather than simply an accounting of initial construction costs.

Buildings – Energy Efficiency report

On 28 June 2013, the Commission published a report on progress by member States towards Nearly Zero-Energy Buildings (NZEB), which are to become the norm for all new buildings in the EU by the end of 2020, and two years earlier for public buildings. This report is largely based on the information contained in the national plans for NZEBs submitted by eight Member States (BE, DK, CY, FI, LT, NL, SE and UK) as of the end of November 2012. In addition, information was drawn from the second National Energy Efficiency Action Plans.

The conclusion of the report is that too little progress has been made by the Member States in their preparations towards NZEBs by 2020. Member States have to significantly step up their efforts to implement the requirements regarding NZEBs in the EPBD to ensure that the EU’s longer-term climate objectives are not jeopardised and the building sector can take full advantage of the opportunities NZEBs present.