South Poland Cleantech Cluster

"Business Networking combined with the presentation of platform members VR, AR i MR"
South Poland Cleantech Cluster invites Cluster Members and Partners to Business Networking Event

 Tuesday, 27.11.2018, at 16.00 - 19.00

Our cyclical Business Networking Event is a unique opportunity to make new acquaintances and business contacts. It is also an excellent opportunity to exchange knowledge and experience between participants.

During an informal networking meeting, members of the VR, AR and MR platform will present their companies and the latest technologies, that you will also be able to use in the future.

Buy free ticket on: SPCleantech-networking

Place: Akademia Górniczo-Hutnicza im. Stanisława Staszica w Krakowie
Centrum Energetyki, bud.C6, sala konf. 307/308, 3p.
ul. Czarnowiejska 36, Kraków
Parking: wjazd ul. Reymonta 7, brama główna
Pasword: cleantech

During the meeting, a special prize will be drawn for the lucky participant of the event

Do not forget about business cards, brochures or other promotional materials - they can be useful.

South Poland Cleantech Cluster

Janusz Kahl, CEO in South Poland Cleantech Cluster has been chosen by the
European Commission as member of the Steering Committee for the project

„Skills for smart industrial specialization and digital transformation”

for Executive Agency for Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (EASME) acting under the powers delegated by the European Commission EASME / DG GROW, which has been granted to PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) in Luxembourg.

EASME is the largest EU agency managing, among others, EU funds from the HORIZON 2020, COSME, LIFE and ERASMUS+ programs.

Members of the Steering Committee will:

  • monitor work and perform reviews of reports developed by PwC
  • meet in Brussels with EASME and the European Commission to review progress and discuss the preparation of periodic reports, which should be approved by the Steering Committee
  • participate in teleconferences
  • provide advice and guidance during work

Se more: Steering Committee

Platform: “Smart-low carbon buildings, BMS-management systems and ecological building materials”

Architects:

  • Bjerg Arkitekter Polska
  • BLOK Architekci
  • Horizon Studio
  • SUMA Architektów

Technological companies:

  • AG System
  • Anew Institute
  • APAGroup
  • BMW
  • C6 Polska
  • Ensalta
  • Frapol
  • KIDS&Co
  • Lumico
  • MARR
  • MPEC Kraków
  • Nilan
  • NordicHouse
  • PalettenWerk
  • RM Filipowicz
  • THB
  • Termoklima
  • Tines
  • Yabimo
  • ZDANIA

Construction:

  • Łęgprzem
  • Podium Park
  • PP Leman

Institutions:

  • Akademia Górniczo Hutnicza (AGH)
    • Centrum Energetyki
    • Centrum Zaawansowanych Technologii Miasta Przyszłości AGH
  • Politechnika Krakowska
    • INTECH PK
    • Małopolskie Centrum Budownictwa Energooszczędnego (MCBE)
  • Uniwersytet Ekonomiczny
  • Uniwersytet Jagielloński
  • Uniwersytet Rolniczy
  • Gmina Raciechowice

NGO:

  • Energie Cités    

Partners:

 Stowarzyszenie Budowniczych Domów i Mieszkań, PLGBC, Ecophon-Saint Gobain, Frapol, Glasssolutions, Macrosoft, Ponzio, Phillips, Samsung

Cluster members such as architects, construction companies, photovoltaic producers, green building materials, building management systems, universities, municipalities and NGOs participate in the platform’s cooperation. The aim of cooperation is to promote innovation among cluster members and to develop an innovative, competitive product to the Polish market.

An Intelligent Building is one that:

  • Provides a productive and cost-effective built environment through optimization of its four basic components – structure, systems, services and management – and the interrelationships between them:
Focusing on the benefit of the owners and their desired indoor environment.
  • So as to maximize the efficiency of its occupants: 
Focusing on the benefit of the users and creating desired indoor environment for occupants
  • Allows effective management of resources with minimum life costs: 
Focusing on the benefit of the Managers and the environmental and economic impact of creating desired indoor environment.

Therefore:

  • The built environment should be productive, safe, healthy, thermally, aurally and visually comfortable.
  • The building has potential to serve future generations: sustainability, or adaptability over the life cycle of the building and safeguarding the earth and environment resources.
  • Financial aspect: the building can be built within some cost constraints whilst retaining market value.

Life Cycle Design

A “cradle-to-grave” analysis of building products, from the gathering of raw materials to their ultimate disposal, provides a better understanding of the long-term costs of materials. These costs are paid not only by the client, but also by the owner, the occupants, and the environment. The principles of Life Cycle Design provide important guidelines for the selection of building materials. Each step of the manufacturing process, from gathering raw materials, manufacturing, distribution, and installation, to ultimate reuse or disposal, is examined for its environmental impact.

A material’s life cycle can be organized into three phases:

Pre-Building; Building; and Post-Building. These stages parallel the life cycle phases of the building itself. The evaluation of building materials’ environmental impact at each stage allows for a cost-benefit analysis over the lifetime of a building, rather than simply an accounting of initial construction costs.

Buildings – Energy Efficiency report

On 28 June 2013, the Commission published a report on progress by member States towards Nearly Zero-Energy Buildings (NZEB), which are to become the norm for all new buildings in the EU by the end of 2020, and two years earlier for public buildings. This report is largely based on the information contained in the national plans for NZEBs submitted by eight Member States (BE, DK, CY, FI, LT, NL, SE and UK) as of the end of November 2012. In addition, information was drawn from the second National Energy Efficiency Action Plans.

The conclusion of the report is that too little progress has been made by the Member States in their preparations towards NZEBs by 2020. Member States have to significantly step up their efforts to implement the requirements regarding NZEBs in the EPBD to ensure that the EU’s longer-term climate objectives are not jeopardised and the building sector can take full advantage of the opportunities NZEBs present.